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We focus on women*

"Plan a city with girls, and it will work for everyone!"

UN Habitat

By 2050, two-thirds of the world’s population will live in cities (Szmigiera 2021). Therefore, their design is the central challenge for our future of living together. 

We aim to create livable, high-quality spaces of equal accessibility to all. Therefore, we asked ourselves: How can cities be designed so that they meet the needs of all their residents? 

Following the guiding principle of the UN-Habitat, we focused on young women*. As an example, we examined the city of Weimar from their perspective.

Why is Weimar not planned for everyone?

Our philosophy

Hello, we are Lia and Lisa, two architecture students at the Bauhaus University Weimar. HerCity Weimar made us more aware: Buildings should not get planned as individual objects but as parts of an integrated urban organism. In particular, the potential for sustainable architecture and urban planning exists in the lively interstices and flowing transitions between public and private. 

 

From the start, we were thrilled by the idea of not just developing utopias and concepts but leaving our mark on a city for the first time. It is clear: We want to contribute to a positive future!




Our network

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Our work relies on constant exchange. We believe that we can achieve more together. That’s why we got in touch with numerous people, associations, and initiatives and built up a network. Open communication and harmonic cooperation were enormously important to us.

 

That is the first step towards a City for all!




Our project diary

spring 2021
March - September
September 9th
September 2021
October 6th
October 6th - December 31th
October 12th
October 27th
October 28 & 30th
October 29th
November 16th
November 18th
November 19th
November 23th
November 25th
December 2nd
December 2nd
December 6th
January 13th
January 17
January 27th
February 10th
March 4th
March 6th
March 8th
Beginning of April

Our Database

Almost no city currently measures gender-sensitive data. For a solid basis of relevant facts, we got active ourselves. On the one hand, we asked young women* for their opinions and observed the behavior of residents in our city spaces. On the other hand, we have read many articles, pored over books, and listened to podcasts. Whether in data collection or research: women* are in our focus.

Our principles of the City for All

"We see the creation of sustainable cities and communities as an opportunity to push real change! In this way, we get a lot closer to the implementation of the 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals and a more livable future!"

HerCity Weimar 2022

Based on our research, we have developed five basic principles of the City for All. With three simple questions in each instance, it is possible to identify. How livable is the city, and where is still a need for action?

 

Our evaluation form is universally applicable to all cities – neighborhoods and district levels, individual squares, and city streets.

Our City for All!

      • → Use our evaluation sheet and look at your neighborhood from a new perspective!
      • → Distribute our posters and stickers to draw attention to challenges in Weimar!
      • → Submit suggestions for female/queer street names to the mayor of Weimar!
      • → While researching, be careful to include women* in history and their work!
      • → Learn to question and critically categorize street names and monuments!
      • → Participate in feminist city walks and organize them yourself!
      • → Don't give hate and insults any room, intervene if possible, and show solidarity with victims of physical and psychological violence!
  • ... realize your projects!
  • ... draw attention to your needs!
  • ... support each other and stick together!
  • ... point out injustices!
    • ... participate in the shaping of your city!
    • ... inform yourself about ongoing projects and participation formats!
    • ... draw attention to injustices and problems!
  • ... pay attention to the inclusive, needs-oriented design of the city!
  • ... advocate the implementation of the 17 UN SDGs!
  • ... promote parity and diversity in planning!
  • ... actively involve residents in planning processes!
  • ... build reliable cooperation and partnerships!
  • ... anchor gender-sensitive planning in teaching!
  • ... give more space to research!
    • ... dare more participation!
    • ... cooperate with the university!
    • ... anchor equality in the city!
    • ... formulate precise goals for the implementation of the UN-SDGs!
    • ... find individual solutions explicitly for challenges in Weimar!
    • ... dare to implement new ideas!
  • What can you do to make a difference?
  • Girls and women in Weimar
  • Residents of Weimar
  • Professionals and planners
  • The City of Weimar
      • → Use our evaluation sheet and look at your neighborhood from a new perspective!
      • → Distribute our posters and stickers to draw attention to challenges in Weimar!
      • → Submit suggestions for female/queer street names to the mayor of Weimar!
      • → While researching, be careful to include women* in history and their work!
      • → Learn to question and critically categorize street names and monuments!
      • → Participate in feminist city walks and organize them yourself!
      • → Don't give hate and insults any room, intervene if possible, and show solidarity with victims of physical and psychological violence!
  • ... realize your projects!
  • ... draw attention to your needs!
  • ... support each other and stick together!
  • ... point out injustices!
  • ... participate in the shaping of your city!
  • ... inform yourself about ongoing projects and participation formats!
  • ... draw attention to injustices and problems!
  • ... pay attention to the inclusive, needs-oriented design of the city!
  • ... advocate the implementation of the 17 UN SDGs!
  • ... promote parity and diversity in planning!
  • ... actively involve residents in planning processes!
  • ... build reliable cooperation and partnerships!
  • ... anchor gender-sensitive planning in teaching!
  • ... give more space to research!
    • ... dare more participation!
    • ... cooperate with the university!
    • ... anchor equality in the city!
    • ... formulate precise goals for the implementation of the UN-SDGs!
    • ... find individual solutions explicitly for challenges in Weimar!
    • ... dare to implement new ideas!

Participate!

… to create a City for All!

Participate!

… to create a City for All!

Feminist City Walk

March 6th 2022

Many celebrations, actions, and events took place around March 8 in Weimar to celebrate International Women’s Day. The Weimar regional branch of the party Bündnis 90/ Die Grünen has invited to the Feminist City Walk in Weimar. At various stops between the train station and Goetheplatz, we talked together about current feminist issues and challenges. Guests included representatives of the Women’s Center Weimar e.V. and the newly elected city council chairwoman Bärbel Fiedler. We also presented the challenges and opportunities of gender-sensitive urban planning and presented two of our fields of action for Weimar: Security & Social Control and Mobility & Accessibility.

Event at Goetheplatz

March 8th 2022

International Women’s Day marked the grand finale of our work. That’s why we came up with something special: Together with the Stellwerk and the Women’s Center Weimar e.V. we have occupied on the empty pedestal on Goetheplatz. With this action, we wanted to draw attention to the lack of representation and appreciation of women* in Weimar. In addition, we collected signatures for more female and queer street names in Weimar. We will then submit this list, along with suggestions for significant female and queer personalities from Weimar, to City Hall for new street naming and renaming.

In addition to a professional photo by a female photographer, the passers-by could not only take away a brochure about significant women* from Weimar but also some of our HerCity Weimar stickers, posters, or even bags! We had lovingly printed and cut these the days before.

Revealing at Schopenhauer Street

March 8th 2022

In Weimar, over 200 streets are named after public figures. But only 20 streets honor important women* from Weimar – a total of less than 10%. Moreover, the street names often cannot be easily associated with the right person. One example: Schopenhauerstrasse along the train station is dedicated to the well-known salonniere Johanna Schopenhauer and not, but often mistaken as to her son, the philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer. For this reason, HerCity Weimar, together with the Women’s Center Weimar e.V., has triumphantly campaigned for an additional sign for Johanna. This we have unveiled on World Women’s Day together with representatives of the city, as well as the Women’s Center Weimar e.V. solemnly!

We focus on Women*

HerCity Initiative

HerCity is an initiative of the United Nation Habitat and the Swedish think tank Global Utmaning. The project website, titled “HerCity – Let her guide you,” was launched on International Women’s Day 2021. It includes an open-source toolbox for implementing participative design projects worldwide and aims to design our cities safer and more livable. So far, urban planning has been oriented towards the ideal of the healthy, working man. That ignores the individual needs of many people who do not correspond to this ideal type. Under the motto “Give her a voice” HerCity promotes urban development explicitly from the point of view of young women* and girls because they form the majority in the group of those who have historically received little attention.  

The HerCity Initiative toolbox focuses on numerous urban development issues and highlights current challenges. Many of them are shaped by our individual use of public spaces and correspond to our own experiences.

At the beginning of our master thesis, we had already lived in the city of Weimar for several years. Accordingly, our experiences in public space were also significantly shaped by it. For this reason, we wanted to make Weimar the center of our research. 

The use of the HerCity Toolbox seemed to us to be a suitable methodology: On one hand, it places great emphasis on participatory work. On the other hand, it focuses on communication and the development of a network. Following the global project, we then launched the initiative “HerCity Weimar” in the summer of 2021 – starting the first HerCity project in Germany.

We were particularly interested in including many different opinions and perspectives in the process. Weimar is not a metropolitan center and is rarely the subject of urbanistic studies. For this reason, we decided to supplement the HerCity Toolbox with additional scientific instruments. Therefore, we additionally measured the public space and surveyed the residents. The workshops suggested in the toolbox helped us underpin the collected data with reports of experiences and opinions. In this way, we closed a relevant data gap and developed the basic principles of the city for all!

We focus on Women*

Gender

The English word sex describes the biological sex, while gender stands for the felt and lived gender. People do not have to be either male or female – gender is a diverse spectrum in which all people can individually locate themselves. 

Our work explicitly focuses on women*. On the one hand, because we identify ourselves as women. On the other hand, they form the largest of the neglected groups. We know that many people cannot identify themselves with the term woman. Often, however, they have had experiences similar to those we document with our work. For us, the gender symbol * symbolizes the diversity of different identities. We want to emphasize that while we focus on the perspective of women* our work can also reflect the realities of many other people’s lives.

Gender roles describe the characteristics and behavior patterns imposed on us by society. The definition of each role depends on temporal and cultural factors. Gender roles are changeable and differ. Nevertheless, they are still associated with many constraints. 

For example, care work is, in tradition, attributed to the role of “woman” (Fraser 2017). They include all tasks and activities related to the care of children and relatives in need of care and the running of the household. This material and emotional work are essential to our society. However, it is neither paid nor sufficiently recognized. Care work is time-consuming and energy-consuming. It prevents many women* from, for example, having a full-time paid job, working on personal issues at the neighborhood meeting in the evenings, or pursuing their interests and hobbies (Reckewerth 2021, 81). The entrenched stereotypes thus quickly become a problem and put those affected at a disadvantage. The list of similar scenarios is long.

Gender-sensitive planning puts the needs of women* in the focus of architecture and urban planning. It brings them into the general awareness. In this way, human-friendly and universally accessible spaces are created. That makes cities, neighborhoods, and public spaces long-lasting and socially sustainable by ultimately enhancing the quality of life for all residents.

The man as the standard of all things – this means androcentrism. Here, the man* is placed at the center of scientific, social, and cultural thinking. The male perspective is understood as the universally valid norm. That is problematic because it makes all non-male needs and views a deviation from the standard.

© By Bundesarchiv, Bild 183-W0512-0316 / Raphael (verehel. Grubitzsch), Waltraud / CC-BY-SA 3.0, CC BY-SA 3.0 de, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=5371186

We focus on Women*

Feminist City

"To make a distinction, it is worth looking to the past.”

Architect and Urban Planner Claudia Schreiber (Schreiber 2021)

The reconstruction-oriented urban planning of the postwar period was based on the principles of car-oriented and “functional city” (WIR FRAUEN 2003, 6). Living, shopping, working, and leisure were spatially separated from each other. Cities favored linear circulation by car and were predominantly tailored to the needs of the industry and the working men*. At the center of these views was the idea of a small family with fixed gender roles. And this even though post-war society was characterized as never before by single and single-parent women*! (Vu, Niemeyer, and Spitzner 2019)

In the 1970s, feminist criticism of planning emerged for the first time. Women* demanded the orientation of architectural and urban planning to their needs. These demands still exist today, although the focus has shifted to other aspects. At that time, safety was considered the most significant issue of women* friendly planning. Women* were understood as “exceptional users in need of protection” (WIR FRAUEN 2003, 6) of public spaces. The city thus turned out to be a place of countless so-called “spaces of fear” for them. Predominantly male planners came up with pragmatic solutions, but they did not get to the root of the problems but merely fought the consequences of bad planning. These included, for example, better lighting and the introduction of so-called women’s parking spaces.

In the 1980s, historian and architecture professor Dolores Hayden contributed to feminist urban planning. In her 1980 essay “What might a non-sexist city look like?”, she criticized the patriarchal power structures of architecture and urban planning at the time. Now the “women*fair” concepts were oriented towards the real everyday life of women*. The desire for short distances and thus for supply possibilities, jobs, and offers close to home came to the fore.

In the 1990s, feminist architecture and urban planning became increasingly combative and purposeful. Since then, the focus has been less on individual building elements or spatial structures and more on visibility and appropriation. “How must public space be designed to enable women to grasp space with equal rights? How can architecture promote emancipatory action?” (WIR FRAUEN 2003, 6) are central questions of this time. The focus is on empowerment, the economic and political strengthening of women*, and the introduction of gender-inclusive concepts, so-called gender mainstreaming (Schreiber 2021).

For the first time, the term gender-sensitive planning is now emerging. The city of Vienna is considered a pioneer of gender mainstreaming in urban planning. A municipal department for gender-sensitive building and design has existed since the 1980s. The urban planner Eva Kail is its most important representative. (Internal link to Eva Kail?) For several years, the city of Vienna has been planning its parks in participatory processes with children and especially girls.

As women* circumstances vary more and more, gender-sensitive planning meets more diverse needs. It considers not only female needs but “human” needs. All people benefit from gender-sensitive planning. All people benefit from gender-sensitive planning, especially those who do not conform to the prevailing ideal of “male, healthy and capable” (Buchmüller 1993, 111).

Wir stellen Frauen* in den Fokus

HerCity Initiative

HerCity ist eine Initiative des United Nation Habitat und des schwedischen Think Tank Global Utmaning. Die Projektwebsite mit dem Titel “HerCity – Let her guide you” wurde am Weltfrauentag 2021 ins Leben gerufen. Sie beinhaltet eine Open-Source-Toolbox zur Umsetzung partizipativer, gestalterischer Projekte auf der ganzen Welt und verfolgt das Ziel, unsere Städte sicherer und lebenswerter zu gestalten. Bis heute orientiert sich die Stadtplanung am Ideal des gesunden, arbeitenden Mannes. Dabei werden die individuellen Bedürfnisse vieler Personengruppen, die nicht diesem Idealtyp entsprechen, ignoriert. Unter dem Motto “Give her a voice” fördert HerCity die Stadtentwicklung explizit aus Sicht junger Frauen* und Mädchen, weil sie in der Gruppe der historisch wenig Beachteten, die Mehrheit bilden. 

Die Toolbox der HerCity Initiative stellt zahlreiche Problematiken der Stadtentwicklung in den Vordergrund und zeigt aktuelle Herausforderungen auf. Viele davon sind von unserer individuellen Nutzung der öffentlichen Räume geprägt und stimmen mit unseren eigenen Erfahrungen überein.

Die Stadt Weimar bildete zu Beginn unserer Masterthesis bereits seit einigen Jahren unseren Lebensmittelpunkt. Demnach waren auch unsere Erfahrungen im öffentlichen Raum maßgeblich von ihr geprägt. Aus diesem Grund war es uns wichtig, Weimar zum Zentrum unserer Untersuchungen zu machen. 

Die Nutzung der HerCity Toolbox erschien uns hierbei als geeignete Methodik: Zum einen legt sie großen Wert auf partizipative Arbeit. Zum anderen stellt sie Kommunikation und den Aufbau eines Netzwerks in den Mittelpunkt. In Anlehnung an das weltweite Projekt haben wir somit im Sommer 2021 die Initiative “HerCity Weimar” ins Leben gerufen und damit das erste HerCity Projekt in Deutschland gestartet.

Wir waren besonders daran interessiert, viele unterschiedliche Meinungen und Perspektiven in den Prozess einzubeziehen. Weimar ist kein Ballungszentrum und selten Gegenstand ausführlicher urbanistischer Untersuchungen. Aus diesem Grund haben wir uns dazu entschieden, die HerCity Toolbox durch weitere wissenschaftliche Instrumente zu ergänzen. So haben wir zusätzlich Messungen im öffentlichen Raum und eine Bewohner:innenbefragung durchgeführt. Die in der Toolbox vorgeschlagenen Workshops haben uns geholfen, die gesammelten Daten mit Erfahrungsberichten und Meinungen zu untermauern. Da wir einen induktiven Forschungsansatz verfolgen, haben wir uns insbesondere auf die Ergebung genderspezifischer Daten für Weimar und die Auswertung dieser gesammelten Informationen konzentriert. Auf diese Weise haben wir nicht nur eine wichtige Datenlücke geschlossen, sondern Grundprinzipien der Stadt für Alle entwickelt!

Wir stellen Frauen* in den Fokus

Gender

  • Gender ist Englisch und bedeutet “Geschlecht”. Sex ist Englisch und bedeutet ebenfalls “Geschlecht”. Der große Unterschied: das englische Wort sex beschreibt das biologische Geschlecht einer Person, während das Wort gender für das gefühlte und gelebte Geschlecht steht. Da die deutsche Sprache an dieser Stelle ungenau ist, nutzen wir den englischen Begriff gender. Damit beschreiben wir die Geschlechtsidentität. Menschen müssen nicht entweder männlich oder weiblich sein – Gender ist ein vielfältiges Spektrum, in dem sich alle Menschen individuell verorten können. 
  • Unsere Arbeit stellt explizit Frauen* in den Fokus. Zum einen, weil wir uns selbst als Frauen identifizieren. Zum anderen bilden sie die größte der wenig beachteten Gruppen. Uns ist bewusst, dass sich viele Menschen selbst nicht mit dem Begriff Frau identifizieren können. Oft haben sie aber ähnliche Erfahrungen gemacht wie die, die wir mit unserer Arbeit dokumentieren. Das Gendersternchen * symbolisiert für uns die Vielfältigkeit der unterschiedlichen Identitäten. Wir möchten betonen, dass wir uns zwar auf die Perspektive von Frauen* konzentrieren, unsere Arbeit aber auch die Lebenswirklichkeit vieler anderer Menschen widerspiegeln kann.

Geschlechterrollen beschreiben die Eigenschaften und Verhaltensmuster, die uns durch die Gesellschaft auferlegt werden. Die Definition der einzelnen Rollen hängt von zeitlichen und kulturellen Faktoren ab. Geschlechterrollen sind veränderbar und unterscheiden sich. Trotzdem sind sie immer noch mit vielen Zwängen verbunden. 

Beispielsweise wird die Care-Arbeit traditionell der Rolle der “Frau” zugeordnet (Fraser 2017). Das umfasst alle Aufgaben und Tätigkeiten zur Versorgung von Kindern und pflegebedürftigen Angehörigen, genauso wie das Führen des Haushalts. Diese materielle und emotionale Arbeit ist für unsere Gesellschaft unentbehrlich. Sie wird aber weder entlohnt, noch genügend anerkannt. Care-Arbeit ist zeitraubend und kräftezehrend. Sie hält viele Frauen* davon ab z. B. einer Vollzeit-Lohnarbeit nachzugehen, sich abends beim Nachbarschaftstreff für persönliche Belange einzusetzen oder eigenen Interessen und Hobbies nachzugehen (Reckewerth 2021, 81). Die festgefahrenen Stereotype werden somit schnell zum Problem und benachteiligen die Betroffenen. Die Liste ähnlicher Szenarien ist lang.

Gendersensible Planung stellt die Bedürfnisse von Frauen* in den Fokus von Architektur und Stadtplanung. Sie rückt diese in das allgemeine Bewusstsein. Dadurch werden menschengerechte und allgemein zugängliche Räume geschaffen. Das macht Städte, Nachbarschaften und öffentliche Räume langlebig und sozial nachhaltig, denn letztlich steigert sie die Lebensqualität aller Bewohner:innen einer Stadt.

Der Mann als Maß der Dinge – das meint Androzentrismus. Hierbei wird der Mann* ins Zentrum des wissenschaftlichen, gesellschaftlichen und kulturellen Denkens gestellt. Die männliche Perspektive wird als allgemeingültige Norm verstanden. Das ist problematisch, denn dadurch werden alle nicht-männlichen Bedürfnisse und Ansichten zur  Abweichung von der Norm.

© By Bundesarchiv, Bild 183-W0512-0316 / Raphael (verehel. Grubitzsch), Waltraud / CC-BY-SA 3.0, CC BY-SA 3.0 de, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=5371186

Wir stellen Frauen* in den Fokus

Feministische Stadt

"Um eine Differenzierung vorzunehmen, lohnt ein Blick in die Vergangenheit.”

Architektin und Stadtplanerin Claudia Schreiber (Schreiber 2021)

Die wiederaufbauende Stadtplanung der Nachkriegszeit orientierte sich an den Leitmotiven der autogerechten und “funktionalen Stadt” (WIR FRAUEN 2003, 6). Wohnen, Einkaufen, Arbeiten und Freizeit wurden räumlich voneinander getrennt. Städte begünstigten die lineare Durchwegung mit dem Auto und waren überwiegend auf die Bedürfnisse der Industrie sowie der arbeitenden Männer* zugeschnitten. Im Zentrum dieser Ansichten stand das Ideal der Kleinfamilie mit festgeschriebenen Geschlechterrollen. Und das, obwohl die Gesellschaft der Nachkriegszeit wie nie zuvor geprägt war von alleinstehenden und alleinerziehender Frauen*! (Vu, Niemeyer, and Spitzner 2019)

In  den 1970er Jahren kam erstmals feministische Kritik an der Planung auf: Frauen* forderten die Ausrichtung der Architektur- und Stadtplanung auf ihre Bedürfnisse. Diese Forderungen bestehen bis heute, auch wenn der Fokus mittlerweile auf anderen Aspekten liegt. Damals galt Sicherheit als das wichtigste Thema der “frauen*freundlichen” Planung. Frauen* wurden als “schutzbedürftige Ausnahme-Benutzerinnen” (WIR FRAUEN 2003, 6) der öffentlichen Räume verstanden. Die Stadt entpuppte sich für sie somit als Ort unzähliger sogenannter “Angsträume”. Überwiegend männliche Planer:innen entwarfen pragmatische Lösungen, allerdings packten sie die Probleme nicht an der Wurzel, sondern bekämpften lediglich die Folgen der Fehlplanung. Dazu gehört beispielsweise bessere Beleuchtung und die Einführung von sogenannten Frauenparkplätzen.

In den 1980er Jahren leistete die Historikerin und Professorin für Architektur Dolores Hayden einen wichtigen Beitrag zur feministischen Stadtplanung. In ihrem Aufsatz “Wie könnte eine nicht-sexistische Stadt aussehen?” kritisierte sie 1980 die patriarchalen Machtstrukturen der damaligen Architektur und Stadtplanung. Nun orientierten sich die “frauen*gerechten” Konzepte  an dem realen Alltag von Frauen*. Der Wunsch nach kurzen Wegen und damit nach wohnungsnahen Versorgungsmöglichkeiten, Arbeitsplätzen und Angeboten trat in den Vordergrund.

Ab den 1990er Jahren wurde die feministische Architektur und Stadtplanung zunehmend kämpferischer und zielstrebiger. Seitdem geht es weniger um einzelne bauliche Elemente oder räumliche Strukturen, sondern vielmehr um Sichtbarkeit und Aneignung. “Wie muss der öffentliche Raum gestaltet sein, um Frauen das gleichberechtigte Raumgreifen zu ermöglichen? Wie kann Architektur emanzipatorisches Handeln fördern?” (WIR FRAUEN 2003, 6) sind zentrale Fragen dieser Zeit. Im Fokus steht Empowerment, die ökonomische und politische Stärkung von Frauen* und die Einführung geschlechter-inklusiver Konzepte, das sogenannte Gender Mainstreaming (Schreiber 2021).

Erstmals kommt jetzt der  Begriff der gendersensiblen Planung auf. Die Stadt Wien gilt als  Vorreiterin des Gender Mainstreaming in der Stadtplanung. Dort gibt es bereits seit den 1980er Jahren eine städtische Abteilung für gendersensibles Bauen und Gestalten. Die Stadtplanerin Eva Kail ist ihre wichtigste Vertreterin. Seit mehreren Jahren plant die Stadt Wien ihre Parks in Beteiligungsverfahren mit Kindern und insbesondere Mädchen.

Da sich die Lebensumstände von Frauen* immer stärker unterscheiden, wird gendersensible Planung immer vielfältigeren Bedürfnissen gerecht. Sie berücksichtigt nicht nur weibliche, sondern “menschliche” Bedürfnisse. Von gendersensibler Planung profitieren alle Menschen. Vor allem die, die nicht dem geltenden Ideal “männlich, gesund und leistungsfähig” entsprechen (Buchmüller 1993, 111).

Why is Weimar not designed for everyone?

Facilities & Furnishing

“The city must adapt its use of space to the lifestyle of its inhabitants - to those who prefer urban life to live in other areas. It must [...] offer people the space they need to live and work."

Sociologist, urban and gender researcher Ulla Terlinden (Terlinden 2003, 191)

The facilities and furnishings of our city have a significant impact on our stationary quality and thus our well-being. It includes structural elements, such as public toilets or seating furniture and the atmosphere, which is influenced, for example, by the surrounding noise or the vegetation of a square. Opportunities to play and do sports, consume or linger are also part of it. In this context, it is enormously important to create commercial and especially consumption-free public spaces – places that are equally accessible to all.

 

Depending on age, gender, and health status, users have different needs. A bench can satisfy one person’s need for recreation, for another person, it can be a place for communication and exchange. The design of our urban spaces can therefore have an immense influence on our coexistence and significantly determine the identity of a place (Fussverkehr Schweiz 2015). However, a large number of women* see their needs only partially met or not met at all. Especially with regard to the topic of care work, only a few offers are made to caregiving women* in public space (Reckewerth 2021, 84). Accordingly, persons with children tend to retreat to designated areas in the city, such as playgrounds. If they are excluded from public spaces, their care work also remains invisible (Reckewerth 2021, 81).

About 95% of Weimar’s women* surveyed feel that the use of their urban spaces is restricted (HerCity Weimar 2021).

Three-quarters of the women* surveyed in Weimar would like more clean, public toilets in the city (HerCity Weimar 2021). So far, most public restrooms are chargeable, poorly maintained, and not barrier-free. Therefore, people usually use the sanitary facilities of public institutions and restaurants. Clean, public toilets with free access to menstrual products increase the well-being of women* and are essential, for example, for female homeless people.

Caring for babies and young children in Weimar’s urban area is difficult for families. Nearly a quarter of the women* between 25 and 40 years of age surveyed stated a lack of opportunities to care for small children (HerCity Weimar 2021). All public spaces lack facilities for diapering, feeding, or breastfeeding young children. Therefore, mothers* in particular, are forced to use commercial, private institutions. In this case, the drugstore chain dm is often the place to go, in Weimar and other cities. It provides a changing table with free diapers and care wipes, as well as a breastfeeding corner (Reckewerth 2021, 43).

In Weimar, there is a lack of consumption-free public seating made of pleasant materials, such as wood, which invite people to communicate. Especially in winter, there is a demand for comfortable seating and shelter from the weather and cold – stated by 67% of the women surveyed (HerCity Weimar 2021). Otherwise, the full use of public spaces is not possible for several months of the year.

In Weimar’s city center, there is only one drinking water fountain. It is private and is located in Seifengasse, according to the Water Protection Department of the Lower Water Authority of the City of Weimar. Especially during hot periods in summer or to supply children or people in need of care, free access to drinking water in the urban area is required.

In a gender-sensitive city, the needs of all groups of people

are taken into account!

We claim for Weimar:

Why is Weimar not designed for everyone?

Mobility & Accessibility

“For a long time, the premise applied that cities had to be car-friendly. Roads, traffic routing, living spaces - in the end, everything is based on the model of the breadwinner who drives to work in the morning and comes back in the evening.”

Journalist Tina Groll (Groll 2021)

Women* in particular often perform unpaid care work additional to paid jobs. That requires them to make multi-stop trips on foot, by bicycle, or public transit (Gore, Stainforth, and Lucic 2021). However, the mobility infrastructure of our cities is based on an outdated role model that envisions the man* as the breadwinner of a family, commuting from home to work in a short amount of time (Vu, Niemeyer, and Spitzner 2019). Men* thus gained easy access to public space – roads and cars were built for them. Today, those who do not drive still have a worse time getting around, take longer to make many trips, and are often at the mercy of motorized traffic. “Car-oriented urban and traffic planning leads to spatial discrimination [and] time expropriation […].” (Vu, Niemeyer, and Spitzner 2019). That must change!

How do Weimar’s residents get to the city center? According to our survey, 84% of women* predominantly walk or ride a bike. In addition, women* are more likely to take the bus. In contrast, the men* surveyed said they were more likely to use the car than the bus (HerCity Weimar 2021). Although women* additionally take many multi-stop trips to combine care and paid work, only 38% of automobiles in Germany are registered to women* according to the Federal Motor Transport Authority (Gore, Stainforth, and Lucic 2021).

Almost half of the respondents would like to see less traffic and more car-free zones in Weimar (HerCity Weimar 2021). In traffic planning, neither cyclists nor pedestrians get priority, but cars. A Current example: the redesign of the Sophienstiftsplatz, where the planners forgot the bike lanes. Or the redesign of Wielandplatz, when the planted green strip made room for an additional turning lane for cars. Both urban planning decisions rely on the best possible traffic flow for automobiles. Especially for people who do care work, this poses a problem. The design of public spaces with barriers and car-friendly traffic routing causes moments of stress and thus makes everyday care work more difficult (Reckewerth 2021, 77).

In the ADFC Bicycle Climate Test of 2020, residents voted on the bicycle-friendliness of their cities. In the ranking of cities with 50-100,000 inhabitants, Weimar took only 80th place out of a total of 110 (Allgemeiner Deutscher Fahrrad-Club 2020)! Thus, Weimar is even below the meager average. The bicycle is considered a generally accessible, easy-to-use way of transport with which all people can move independently and self-determined. Women* and children, in particular, can extend their range of motion on their own. The bicycle is our emancipation machine!

A survey conducted by the city of Weimar in 2015 on the status quo of bike lanes revealed that more than 50% of the respondents feel unsafe while biking in Weimar, about 11% of them even stated that they do not feel safe at all (Stadtentwicklungsamt Weimar Abt. Stadtplanung and AG Radverkehr Weimar 2017). A secure, well-developed cycling network is crucial for women*, seniors, and children, as lack of safety when cycling is their main barrier (Macmichael 2021)). The success of Weimar’s bike referendum confirms the increased desire for more structurally delineated bike lanes and thus improved traffic safety.

The traffic light at Wielandplatz is too short for children, senior citizens, people with limited mobility, or people carrying their heavy shopping home from the city. Short traffic light phases for pedestrians only benefit the traffic flow of cars. The traffic light at Wielandplatz, for example, is only green for eleven seconds (HerCity Weimar 2021).

The routes, the ticket offer, and the vehicles of StadtWirtschaft Weimar do not meet the needs of women*, children, and senior citizens. From 11 p.m. onwards, the public transport system is almost shut down (StadtWirtschaft Weimar 2021). Independent and individual evening planning is thus not possible.

People with disabilities are less visible in Weimar’s public spaces to 80% of the residents surveyed (HerCity Weimar 2021). Due to the cobblestones, the city center is an obstacle for people with limited mobility, cyclists, and families with strollers.

In a gender-sensitive city, pedestrians, cyclists

and people with disabilities do have priority!

We claim for Weimar:

Why is Weimar not designed for everyone?

Security & Social Control

"A sense of security is an important criterion for women and girls in particular when using public space."

City of Vienna about security in public space (Stadt Wien, 2019)

Lack of lighting and places with poor visibility poses a high risk of accidents and influence our perception of safety. Unconsciously, we develop strategies to feel safer in certain areas or situations. We detour or select a self-determined, fast form of movement, such as our bicycle. Some share their live location with friends, others always have their keys in hand on the way home. A sense of insecurity restricts people with a heightened need for security. Females, in particular, are socialized to be afraid at night, of strangers, and in public places. Constantly organizing their safety is the result. That limits their use of public spaces (Kern 2020, 161). 

As early as the 1960s, architect and urban planner Jane Jacobs called for around-the-clock neighborhoods and mixed-use districts. Liveliness and the intensive use of public spaces lead to more security and increasing trust among residents through positive social control. It is about time to put this demand into practice!

Over 90% of Weimar’s women* surveyed do not like to be in certain places at certain times of the day – about 91% of them in the dark or at night (HerCity Weimar 2021).

Around 50% of the women* surveyed had already deliberately taken detours to avoid certain places in Weimar. Parks, such as the Ilm Park or the Weimarhallenpark, were mentioned. Also, places like Wielandplatz or Goetheplatz and busy unlit streets are among them (HerCity Weimar 2021).

Over 40% of female residents lack good lighting, especially in parks. In winter, the proportion rises to almost 50% (HerCity Weimar 2021). However, other aspects also play a leading role in the debate about better and balanced lighting. Unfortunately, the human need for safety is often ignored – for the benefit of lower electricity costs, for example.

Often street lighting in Weimar is located centrally above the street. Thus, the pedestrian and bicycle paths are usually dark. “Either I take the humpy, dark bike path on the park side, I expose myself to stupid comments from passersby on the city side, or I share the road with cars speeding by.” (Anna, HerCity Weimar Team.) Weimar’s street lighting is also not planned for walking and biking residents, but its cars.

The need for safety and protection in public spaces is not satisfied for more than 20% of Weimar’s residents. Increasing numbers of women* want more security and an improved sense of safety (HerCity Weimar 2021). An online platform, called Catcalls of Weimar, collects reports of experiences, especially from affected women*. These are often victims of so-called microaggressions, derogatory, mostly verbal statements. These include comments, being honked at on the open street, or being observed. These are not punishable by law but can have a lasting impact on each individual’s sense of security. In addition, a quarter of the residents have been witnesses or victims of violence in public spaces.

@catcallsofweimar / Instagram

“Weimar is extinct in the evening!”  (Quote from a HerCity participant) Our feeling of safety depends on various factors. Sometimes we feel unsafe because of structural measures, and other times because of subjective impressions. This map shows where the interviewed women* feel uncomfortable in Weimar (HerCity Weimar 2021). The number of different places confirms that our perception of safety depends on various factors.

In a gender-sensitive city, the safe use of public space is possible for all!

We claim for Weimar:

Why is Weimar not designed for everyone?

Visibility & Appropriation

„Many of these barriers are invisible to men, because their own set of experiences means they rarely encounter them. This means that the primary decision-makers in cities, who are still mostly men, are making choices about everything [...] with no knowledge, let alone concern for, how these decisions affect women.”

Professor and author Leslie Kern (Kern 2020, 11)

Planners significantly determine the majority of their design work through their circumstances. For this reason, it is essential to promote diverse teams. Although study places in architecture and urban planning are distributed almost equally, the national average of female urban planners in 2021 is only 36.6% (BAK 2021). However, the female share is steadily increasing. 

In addition, another question must get answered: Who decides here? After all, who has the decision-making power controls the design of public spaces. Here, too, it is crucial to keep the interests of all citizens in mind. Ultimately, they are the users of the urban realm and should satisfy their needs there. Uninhabited spaces and a lack of opportunities for appropriation and personalization lead to exclusion, vandalism, and the feeling of security. Various formats of participation serve the purpose. However, these are not accessible to all people, for example, due to the choice of date or location. Caregivers, in particular, have little time for additional participation work in addition to their daily routines. It is about time to change that!

Out of 43 voting members of the city council, only 14 are women*(City Council Weimar 2022). They form a minority in political decisions.

The city administration of Weimar is a gigantic administrative organization. Nevertheless, there is only one single office responsible for equality. In addition to promoting equal opportunities for women* and men*, the area of responsibility also includes handling reports of discrimination (Stadt Weimar 2022). The Equal Opportunities Officer in Weimar only has an advisory function.

In university studies, the distribution of students is almost equal, yet only 40 % of the planners in Weimar are women* (Architektenkammer Thüringen 2021). Weimar is somewhat above the national average (BAK 2021).

Weimar’s city center is planned primarily for its tourists. The top priority is to preserve the tourist-friendly image to strengthen the economic sector. It constantly tries to maintain a cityscape reminiscent of Goethe’s times. For example, by keeping cobblestones all over, most of the alleys and squares are not barrier-free. The only question is: Who owns the city?

In the gender-sensitive city, our diverse society is visible at all levels!

We claim for Weimar:

Why is Weimar not designed for everyone?

Representation & Appreciation

"Street names are part of a city's memory!"

Economic and social historian Rita Bake (Bake 2015, 6)

Whether street names, squares, monuments, individual buildings, or whole neighborhoods: The entire public space of a city commemorates significant personalities or historical events. However, to this day, women* and non-binary people are less appreciated in public space. Missing urban space also means not enough space in people’s consciousness. Consequently, we remember their professional achievements and social activities less often. That has to change – after all, we use our urban spaces every day. They subconsciously shape our understanding of gender roles and social participation.

Weimar’s public space communicates an outdated image of society. The equestrian statue of Grand Duke Carl August on Democracy Square, for example, stands in extreme contrast to the nameless sculpture of a mother on Donndorf Square. The presented historically idealized distribution of roles has no longer anything to do with our current image of society.

02.6_Statuen

In Weimar, more than 200 streets show the names of public figures. But only 20 streets honor significant women* from Weimar – less than 10%. Moreover, the street names often cannot be easily assigned to the right person. One example: Schopenhauerstrasse, along with the train station, is dedicated to the well-known writer Johanna Schopenhauer and not, as generally assumed, to her son, philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer.

“More Johanns than women” owns the current list for new and renaming of streets in Weimar. Among 21 proposals for street names, there is only one woman. There is no improvement ahead!

In Weimar, there is only one monument dedicated to a female public figure: the Käthe Kollwitz statue on Zeppelinplatz. Here, too, it is striking: The statue has only a flat base. Although she has a determined posture, the viewer is at eye level with her – unlike Goethe and Schiller on Theaterplatz or Carl August on Democracy Square.

In a gender-sensitive city, there is balance in the

culture of remembrance in public spaces!

We claim for Weimar:

Our Philosophy

Sustainability

The term sustainability describes numerous, constant processes – sustainable developments. On the one hand, they ensure that our current needs get met. On the other hand, they guarantee that future generations will also meet their needs. For this purpose, the United Nations has formulated the “17 Sustainable Development Goals”. They are an urgent call to action because not a single goal has been met so far. Particularly complicated: All the resolutions are closely interlinked. Only if all are considered and advanced is sustainable development within reach.

HerCity Weimar takes a closer look at the following goals:

Goal #5 covers gender equality. It aims, in particular, to equalize opportunities and participation of women*, but also to fight against societal constraints and any violence against women*.

Goal #10 calls for the elimination of social, economic, and political inequalities. Instead, the equality of people should be strengthened and promoted, regardless of age, gender, limitations, origin, religion, or financial background. Public space cannot address this inequity on its own. Nevertheless, its design is essential to support everyday contexts, meet needs, and break down barriers.

Goal #11 addresses the development of sustainable cities and communities. They should be made more inclusive, safe, and resilient. It also aims to guarantee that all people have universal access to public spaces and green areas in the future. That explicitly includes women*, children, non-binary and senior citizens, and people with disabilities. Their needs have been neglected in urban planning so far.

Goal #16 centers on, in part, cross-topic collaborations and politics. Responsive, inclusive, participatory, and representative decision-making should be guaranteed at all levels. Those who have decision-making power also control the design of public space. Due to a lack of representation, the interests of children and young people, senior citizens, women*, and people with disabilities still play a subordinate role. They are supposedly the minority – but in fact, they are the majority!

To implement all these goals successfully, we need to focus on our partnerships, according to Goal #17. HerCity Weimar has shown us that these collaborations exist not only on an international level but also on a local level. We can achieve more if everyone works together. That’s why we got in touch with numerous people, associations, and initiatives and built up a network. With open communication, we have raised the awareness for gender-sensitive urban planning and convinced people of our ideas.

Our Philosophy

Weimar

Weimar is a city in the German state of Thuringia with about 65,000 inhabitants (Stadtentwicklungsamt 2021). It is known for its rich cultural heritage. Large parts of the city center are part of the UNESCO World Heritage. 

The city has played a leading role in German history several times: it was the center of Weimar Classicism with its famous representative’s duchess Anna Amalia and Goethe. In 1919, the first German National Assembly convened in the German National Theater in Weimar. It adopted the constitution of the Weimar Republic. At the same time, a group of revolutionary artists founded an art school, which became the starting point of the Bauhaus movement. Weimar is therefore visited by numerous tourists every year. Tourism is accordingly one of the most significant sectors of the economy. 

Weimar is also a university town, about 7% of the inhabitants are students (Stadtentwicklungsamt 2021). They study at the Bauhaus University or the Franz Liszt Academy of Music. Nevertheless, Weimar is affected by the demographic change as well. The proportion of elderly residents is growing steadily (Stadtentwicklungsamt 2021).

 

Weimar is a medium-sized city with a compact structure. That means that planning and spatial conflicts quickly become apparent. Due to the large tourism industry, the interests of the residents are often neglected, such as the desire for better lighting or barrier-free paths through the city center. We expose these problems and develop new strategies and solutions. A change of perspective helps here. We ask ourselves: How does the Weimar of women* look?

How do we relate to Weimar? We moved to Weimar to study and have lived here for several years. Therefore, we know the city and its surroundings very well. That includes the mentality of the people and the contact to different stakeholders of the city.

Over time, we have collected many memories and emotions about this place. That’s why we decided to take a closer look at our study city in our last semester.

Our Philosophy

Public Space

"Spaces don't do anything by themselves, but they support certain everyday contexts or create barriers."

Urban Planner Eva Kern (Jahn and Kail 2019)

In cities, people socialize, have fun, relax, or do errands. Individuals encounter a crowd of people here. In this way, a gray street becomes a colorful neighborhood. Public spaces are considered hubs for culture, science, and productivity. All the developments and changes in a society become visible here. That is why they are also of particular value. The structure and planning of a city impact the behavior of its citizens directly.

Public spaces include areas that are ideally available to all people equally. These are all parks, streets, or squares in a city. What is unique about them: Public spaces guarantee diverse and consumption-free use. They are flexible and can get shaped by all citizens.

We consider semi-public spaces to be places that represent a transition between private and public spaces. These places are not private because they are not at the use of one person or group of people. However, they are also not public because they are not owned by the general public. These include, for example, cafes, libraries, and department stores.

Private spaces include places that are available to us individually. From shared rooms to single-family homes, from loggias to private gardens. Places that we share at most with roommates and friends, partners, or our family.

Unser Selbstverständnis

Nachhaltigkeit

Der Begriff Nachhaltigkeit umschreibt unzählige, konstante Prozesse – die nachhaltigen Entwicklungen. Diese gewährleisten zum einen die Erfüllung unserer heutigen Bedürfnisse. Zum anderen stellen sie sicher, dass auch nachfolgende Generationen ihre Bedürfnisse befriedigen können. Die United Nations haben dazu die “17 Ziele zur nachhaltigen Entwicklung” formuliert. Sie sind ein dringender Aufruf zum Handeln, denn derzeit ist noch kein einziges Ziel erreicht. Besonders kompliziert: Alle Vorsätze sind eng miteinander verknüpft. Erst wenn alle berücksichtigt und vorangetrieben werden, ist die nachhaltige Entwicklung in greifbarer Nähe. HerCity Weimar nimmt die folgenden Ziele genauer unter die Lupe:

Ziel Nr. 5 widmet sich der Gleichstellung der Geschlechter. Es zielt insbesondere auf die Chancengleichheit und Teilhabe von Frauen* ab, aber auch auf die Bekämpfung von gesellschaftlichen Zwängen und jeglicher Gewalt gegen Frauen*.

Ziel Nr. 10 fordert die Auflösung von sozialer, wirtschaftlicher und politischer Ungleichheit. Stattdessen soll die Gleichberechtigung der Menschen gestärkt und gefördert werden, unabhängig von deren Alter, Gender, Einschränkungen, Herkunft, Religion oder finanziellem Hintergrund. Der öffentliche Raum kann diese Ungerechtigkeit nicht allein beseitigen. Seine Gestaltung ist trotzdem essentiell, um Alltagszusammenhänge zu unterstützen, Bedürfnissen gerecht zu werden und Barrieren abzubauen.

Ziel Nr. 11 behandelt die Entwicklung nachhaltiger Städte und Gemeinden. Sie sollen integrativer, sicherer und widerstandsfähiger gestaltet werden. Außerdem soll garantiert werden, dass zukünftig alle Menschen allgemeinen Zugang zu öffentlichen Räumen und Grünflächen bekommen. Dabei sind ausdrücklich Frauen*, Kinder, nicht-binäre sowie alte Menschen und Menschen mit Einschränkungen gemeint. Ihre Bedürfnisse wurden in der Stadtplanung bisher vernachlässigt.

Ziel Nr. 16 dreht sich u.a. um themenübergreifende Zusammenarbeit und Politik. Reaktionsfähige, inklusive, partizipative und repräsentative Entscheidungsfindung soll auf allen Ebenen gewährleistet werden. Wer Entscheidungsgewalt besitzt, steuert auch die Gestaltung des öffentlichen Raums. Auf Grund fehlender Repräsentation spielen die Interessen von Kindern und Jugendlichen, Senior:innen, Frauen* und Menschen mit Beeinträchtigung bis heute eine untergeordnete Rolle. Sie bilden vermeintlich die Minderheit – dabei sind sie tatsächlich die Mehrheit!

Um all diese Ziele erfolgreich umzusetzen, müssen wir uns auf unsere Partnerschaften konzentrieren, so Ziel Nr. 17. HerCity Weimar hat uns schnell bewusst gemacht, dass diese Kooperationen nicht nur international, sondern insbesondere lokal existieren. Wir können mehr erreichen, wenn alle an einem Strang ziehen. Deshalb sind wir mit zahlreichen Personen, Vereinen und Initiativen in Kontakt getreten und haben uns ein großes Netzwerk aufgebaut. Durch offene Kommunikation haben wir gendersensibler Stadtplanung mehr Aufmerksamkeit verschafft und konnten von unseren Ideen überzeugen.

Unser Selbstverständnis

Weimar

  • Weimar ist eine Stadt im Bundesland Thüringen mit ca. 65.000 Einwohner:innen (Stadtentwicklungsamt 2021). Sie ist für ihr reiches kulturelles Erbe bekannt. Weite Teile des Stadtzentrums gehören zum UNESCO-Welterbe. 
  • Die Stadt spielte in der deutschen Geschichte mehrfach eine tragende Rolle: Sie war Zentrum der Weimarer Klassik mit den bekannten Vertreter:innen Herzogin Anna Amalia und Goethe. Im Deutschen Nationaltheater und Staatskapelle Weimar tagte 1919 die erste deutsche Nationalversammlung. Sie verabschiedete die Verfassung der Weimarer Republik. Parallel dazu gründete eine Gruppe revolutionärer Künstler:innen eine Kunstschule, die zum Ausgangspunkt der Bauhaus-Bewegung wurde. Weimar wird daher jährlich von zahlreichen Tourist:innen besucht. Daher ist der Tourismus einer der wichtigsten Wirtschaftszweige. Weimar ist zudem eine Universitätsstadt, etwa 7 % der Einwohner:innen sind Student:innen (Stadtentwicklungsamt 2021). Sie lernen an der Bauhaus-Universität oder der Hochschule für Musik Franz Liszt. Trotzdem ist auch Weimar vom demografischen Wandel betroffen. Der Anteil der Bewohner:innen in hohem Alter wächst stetig (Stadtentwicklungsamt 2021).

Weimar ist eine überschaubare Mittelstadt mit einer kleinteiligen Struktur. So werden schnell planerische und räumliche Konflikte sichtbar. Durch den großen Wirtschaftszweig des Tourismus werden die Belange der Bewohner:innen oft hinten angestellt, wie z. B. der Wunsch nach besserer Beleuchtung oder barrierefreien Wegen durch die Innenstadt. Wir legen diese Probleme offen und entwickeln neue Strategien und Lösungen. Dazu hilft uns ein Perspektivwechsel. Wir fragen uns: Wie sieht das Weimar der Frauen* aus?

Wie stehen wir zu Weimar? Wir sind zum Studieren nach Weimar gekommen und leben hier seit mehreren Jahren. Dadurch kennen wir uns sehr gut in der Stadt und ihrer Umgebung aus. Dazu gehört auch die Mentalität der Menschen sowie der Kontakt zu unterschiedlichen Akteur:innen der Stadt.

Über die Zeit haben wir viele Erinnerungen und Emotionen zu diesem Ort gesammelt. In unserem letzten Semester als Studentinnen haben wir uns deshalb noch einmal intensiv mit unserer Studienstadt auseinandergesetzt.

Unser Selbstverständnis

Öffentlicher Raum

"Räume tun von sich aus nichts, aber sie unterstützen bestimmte Alltagszusammenhänge oder sie stellen Barrieren dar."

Stadtplanerin Eva Kern (Jahn and Kail 2019)

In Städten kommen Menschen in Kontakt, sie vergnügen und entspannen sich oder tätigen Erledigungen. Einzelne Personen treffen hier auf eine Schar von Menschen. So wird aus einer grauen Straße eine bunte Nachbarschaft. Die öffentlichen Räume gelten als Knotenpunkte für Kultur, Wissenschaft und Produktivität. Hier werden alle Entwicklungen und Veränderungen einer Gesellschaft sichtbar. Deshalb sind sie besonders wertvoll. Die Strukturen einer Stadt und ihre Planung haben somit direkten Einfluss auf das Verhalten ihrer Bewohner:innen.

Zu den öffentlichen Räumen zählen wir Orte, die idealerweise allen Menschen gleichermaßen zur Verfügung stehen. Das sind sämtliche Parks, Straßen oder Plätze einer Stadt. Das Besondere: Die öffentlichen Räume garantieren eine vielfältige und konsumfreie Nutzung. Sie sind flexibel und können von allen Bewohner:innen einer Stadt mitgestaltet werden.

Zu den halböffentlichen Räumen zählen wir Orte, die einen Übergang zwischen den privaten zu den öffentlichen Räumen darstellen. Diese Orte sind nicht privat, weil sie keiner einzelnen Person oder Personengruppen zur Verfügung stehen. Sie sind aber auch nicht öffentlich, da sie nicht im Besitz der Allgemeinheit sind. Hierzu gehören zum Beispiel Cafès, Bibliotheken oder Kaufhäuser.

Zu den privaten Räumen zählen wir Orte, die uns individuell zur Verfügung stehen. Vom WG-Zimmer bis zum Einfamilienhaus, von der Loggia bis zum eigenen Garten. Orte, die wir höchstens mit Mitbewohner:innen und Freund:innen, Partner:innen oder unserer Familie teilen.

Public Relations

We want to inspire Weimar’s residents for gender-sensitive urban planning. From the beginning, we let them participate in the progress of our project and shared the results with them. For this purpose, we used different channels of communication.

Cooperations

With the help of our cooperations, we were able to increase the reach of HerCity Weimar enormously and raise awareness for gender-sensitive urban planning in Weimar for the first time! We like to thank all our partners for their fantastic cooperation:

As part of the school vacation program of the Schwungfabrik, we organized a workshop on the topic "Future Workshop - What should Weimar look like in the future?" for schoolchildren.

Together with the Frauenzentrum e.V. we stand up for an adequate appreciation of women* in public space.

Shops and restaurants of the Innenstadt e.V. display our posters on the Five Fields of Action of Gender-Sensitive Urban Planning in Weimar.

The city of Weimar, especially the office of the equal opportunity commissioner and the commissioner for building and urban development answered many of our questions about urban planning and politics

The UN-Habitat was happy to support us with assistance at any time. In addition, a report on HerCity Weimar will be published as an independent project in the annual report of the worldwide HerCity campaign.

Support

Thanks to numerous supporters, HerCity Weimar has grown into a city-wide initiative. We would especially like to thank all those who have actively supported us in the implementation of our goals and ideas:

Our university supported us with the help of the Women's Promotion Fund and the graduation scholarship.

Die Brotklappe Weimar provided our workshops and discussion rounds with delicious Catering on several occasions.

In addition to their outstanding expertise, Gehl Architects supplied us with software to do public space public life measurements

The two podcast stations “Wir sind Bauhaus” and “Bauhaus.FM” and the local radio station Radio Lotte helped us to expand our reach.

Öffentlichkeitsarbeit

Wir möchten Weimars Bewohner:innen für gendersensible Stadtplanung begeistern. Von Beginn an haben wir sie unserem Projektfortschritt teilhaben lassen und ihnen die gewonnenen Ergebnisse mitgeteilt. Hierfür haben wir unterschiedliche Kanäle der Kommunikation genutzt.

Kooperationen

Mit Hilfe unserer Kooperationen konnten wir die Reichweite von HerCity Weimar enorm vergrößern und erstmals die Aufmerksamkeit auf gendersensible Stadtplanung in Weimar lenken! Wir möchten uns bei allen Partner:innen für die tolle Zusammenarbeit bedanken:

im Rahmen des Ferienprogramms der Schwungfabrik haben wir einen Workshop zum Thema “Zukunftswerkstatt – Wie soll Weimar in Zukunft aussehen?” für Schüler:innen organisiert

gemeinsam mit dem Frauenzentrum e.V. setzen wir uns für eine angemessene Würdigung von Frauen* im öffentlichen Raum ein

Geschäfte und Gastronomien des Innenstadt e.V. stellen unsere Plakate zu den Fünf Handlungsfeldern gendersensibler Stadtplanung in Weimar aus

die Stadt Weimar, insbesondere das Büro der Gleichstellungsbeauftragten und die Beigeordnete für Bauen und Stadtentwicklung beantworteten uns zahlreiche Fragen zur Stadtentwicklung und Politik

das UN-Habitat hat uns jederzeit gerne mit Hilfestellung unterstützt, darüber hinaus wird ein Bericht über HerCity Weimar als unabhängiges Projekt im Jahresbericht der weltweiten HerCity-Kampagne veröffentlicht

Unterstützung

Dank zahlreicher Unterstützer:innen ist HerCity Weimar zur einer stadtweiten Initiative gewachsen. Wir möchten uns insbesondere bei allen bedanken, die uns bei der Umsetzung unserer Ziele und Ideen tatkräftig unterstützt haben:

Unsere Universität förderte uns mit Hilfe des Frauenförderfonds und des Abschlussstipendiums.

Die Brotklappe Weimar versorgte unsere Workshops und Gesprächsrunden mehrfach mit leckerem Catering

Das Büro Gehl Architects stellte uns neben ihrer hervorragenden Expertise eine Software zur optimalen Durchführung von Public Space Public Life Messungen zur Verfügung. 

Der Podcast Wir sind Bauhaus, das experimentelle Radio Bauhaus.fm sowie der lokale Radiosender Radio Lotte halfen uns dabei unsere Reichweite zu vergrößern.

Requested

During our research, we were in constant exchange with the residents of Weimar and the city’s actors. In our conversations and discussions, it was quickly apparent that only a few people were aware of the relevance and topicality of gender-sensitive urban planning. Open discussion and question rounds awakened a high level of interest within all interviewees and sensitized them to the topic. The exchange of thoughts and experiences is just as essential as collecting scientific data and facts.

Researched

The man as the standard of all things – this is also true in science! Whether in business, the workplace, or urban planning – male bodies and experiences are the norms (Schwarz and Criado-Perez 2020). 

To date, hardly any city collects gender-sensitive data. Consequently, gender-sensitive urban planning is also poorly covered in the literature. Therefore, it is crucial to conduct more research in this topic area and collect new findings. Recently, Gender-sensitive urban planning gained importance, with more articles, podcasts, and books published. Fortunately, a positive trend is coming up!

Books, publications and articles

More than 20 years ago, the project group Unsere Stadt - Frauen planen Stadt (Our City - Women Plan City) was founded in Weimar.

At a symposium in cooperation with the Bauhaus University Weimar on March 22, 1997, women* from various walks of life discussed urban development problems in Weimar that needed improvement. The demands collected there should then be introduced into the daily work of urban development. Unfortunately, the working group disbanded after only a short time. Many of the demands from back then are still relevant today - they overlap with the findings from our residents' survey, our interviews, and the participatory workshops in 2021.

The association WIR FRAUEN - Verein zur Förderung von Frauenpublizistik e.V. (WIR FRAUEN - Association for the Promotion of Women's Journalism e.V.) has been publishing feminist magazines since 1982. Already three editions provide information on gender-sensitive urban planning.

Leslie Kern's book "Feminist City: Claiming Space in a Man-Made World" highlights the obstacles and barriers women* face in the public space. She discusses issues around safety and fear, paid and unpaid work, or rights and representation.

Eva Kail is an Austrian urban planner at the Office for Strategic Planning in Vienna, and she is an expert in planning and building for women*. For over 30 years, she has played a significant role in establishing feminist urban planning. Kail advocates for gender mainstreaming within the housing, transportation, planning, and the design of public spaces. In numerous articles, publications, and interviews, she explains the importance of gender-sensitive urban planning and presents various concepts from Vienna.

Jan Gehl is a Danish architect, urban planner, and the founder of Gehl Architects in Copenhagen. To this day, his studies on the relationship between public space and public life are considered essential foundations for the development of livable and people-oriented cities.

In his book Cities for People, Jan Gehl outlines the human scale as the most relevant principle in planning livable cities. Gehl Architects have developed various methods for collecting data and understanding the use of public space better.

The 12 quality criteria they have developed are a tool for examining public spaces from the perspective of their users. Based on different characteristics, they evaluate how protective, comfortable, and social the design of the public realm is. 

Public Space Public Life measurements, or PSPL, help map movement patterns and stationary activities in the public space. The study of people's behavior is of essential importance for a better understanding of their use of the public realm. This knowledge enables the development of high-quality spaces.

The book "Invisible Women" by Caroline Criado Perez deals with the so-called Gender Data Gap. How is data collected in science, and what impact does this have on the reality of women's lives? The author shows why collecting gender-sensitive data is essential for all of us.

In her bachelor thesis "Who cares? - Care work in Weimar", Eva Maria Johanna Reckewerth focuses on women*'s experiences with children. They carry the main load of care work. The place of investigation is Weimar's Westvorstadt. The work addresses the questions: Which spaces use women* in everyday care-work, and how are they perceived? How do the spatial conditions affect the performance of care work?

Podcasts

The german podcast series "Eclectic Engineering" deals with current issues around art, philosophy, and feminism. In the episode "Feminist Urban Planning", Marie von Heyl discusses the benefits of feminist urban planning with political scientist Janna Aljets. This episode was published on August 10, 2020.

The Lila Podcast looks at overall world happenings from a feminist perspective. In the episode "Gender and mobility - How sexist is transport planning?" Laura Lucas discusses feminist transport politics with mobility expert Katja Diehl. This episode was published on 09 September 2021 in german.

Our principles of the City for All

What is the City for All? Regarding the climate crisis, it quickly gets clear: It is essential to leave no one behind and face the challenges together. Participation and inclusion in the community, being heard, and finding ourselves are basic human needs. To promote and encourage sustainable thinking and behavior, it is essential to put people and their needs at the center of the City of All.

Due to the current high-speed life of society, people are paradoxically becoming more and more lonely, even in cities with millions of inhabitants (Wagener 2016). Therefore, strengthening communities to build resilient relationships is crucial. On top of that, creating many collectively usable spaces helps save space and organize in a meaningful way. The welcoming openness of people to share with their neighbors, interact, and benefit from each other, remains the heart of the City for All.

Download our evaluation sheet and look at your neighborhood from a new perspective!

In the City for All, cars no longer determine the rhythm of the city but the residents themselves. A dense pedestrian and bicycle network, good infrastructure, and functional mixing create short distances. In this way, the urban design supports the smooth organization of everyday life and the management of care and paid work (Nickel 2021). A variety of sustainable modes of transport enables all people to access the city independently and in a self-determined manner. Climate-friendly mobility motivates residents to live a healthy, active lifestyle on the one hand and improves air quality and noise pollution enormously on the other (Günther 2017). The entire population benefits from this city.

What is the dimensioning and condition of the paths?

• wide footpaths and safe crossings
• connected, constructed network of cycle paths
• barrier-free, secure and non-slip surfaces
 
Is there a wide range of various and well-coordinated means of transport as an alternative to the car?

• self-determined, free choice of means of transport
a smooth flow of everyday routes
• barrier-free mobility that can be used independently 
 
Does the design of public spaces support the smooth organization of everyday life?

• relevant facilities for daily needs are reachable within 15 minutes by foot or bike
dense infrastructure improves efficiency and time management
recognition of care work and integration into infrastructure

The City for All blurs the boundaries between public and private. Protective planning measures turn urban space into a “public living room”. Through personal interaction in the neighborhoods, residents gain confidence in their surroundings and create a solid social network. In this way, the everyday lives of individual residents are greatly simplified, and their mental health is improved. All this increases the sense of security and belonging. The Viennese urban planner Eva Kail puts it in a nutshell: “[Public spaces] create the social capital of a city!” 

(Nickel 2021).

Are there preventive measures of protection?

structural and planning measures for the active prevention of accidents
ensuring proper, well-balanced lighting
good air quality without dust and emissions
 
Does the design of public space improve the subjective feeling of safety?

decrease of the fear of traffic
clarity and easy orientation
social control through a lively environment
 
Does the design of public space encourage neighborly behavior?

sense of belonging and feeling "at home"
smooth transitions between the public and private spheres
support the independent movement of children

The City for All meets its residents at eye level. It invites them to meet their needs in the public space and prioritizes their wishes over economic concerns or – as has been the practice for a long time – cars. Planners have understood the direct relationship of a cities’ built and structural quality, its atmosphere, and its quality of life (Gehl 2015, 29). Green open spaces and good ventilation create a pleasant urban climate. The equipment of public spaces enables residents to survive heat summers in the best possible way and stay healthy. All residents benefit from good amenities and room to breathe.

Does the equipment of the urban space meet the needs of all users?

clean, public toilets
free and unlimited access to drinking water
infrastructure for managing care work
good design and choice of materials and protection from weather conditions
 
Does the design of the urban space strengthen physical and mental health?

pleasant soundscape and good air quality
green oases with trees, plants, and water
opportunities for play, physical activity, and exercise
attractive, inviting facades and interesting views
 
Are there multiple offerings for different users?

a balance between commercial and public facilities
possibility to buy and consume food cheaply
overlapping uses in terms of time and function
Seating that promotes social interaction

In the City for All, the public space is designed according to our wishes and ideas. It invites us to implement our visions and to express ourselves. Until today, the interests of children and young people, senior citizens, women*, and people with disabilities have played a subordinate role. They are supposedly the minority – but in fact, they are the majority! Making this majority visible, the City for All creates diverse and tolerant spaces. In the past, the “man was the standard of all things” (Buchmüller 1993, 117), today it is the human being. When humans are at the center of urban design, we can reclaim public spaces from cars and commercialization.

Are people in the focus of the the design of public space?

Consideration of different needs and demands on public space
the design and planning is oriented on the human scale
 
Are there opportunities to personalize the space?

expression of own thoughts, ideas, and dreams
the self-determined decision about the individual use of space
possibility to design the space by oneself
identification with the surroundings
 
Does the urban design allow flexibility and multifunctionality?

possibility of individual arrangement of seating
flexible use of street furniture and public space
possibility for privacy through small niches and zoning
use of urban spaces at all times of the day and year

Urban space presents the image of the society that lives in this city. Streets, squares, and monuments tell a new story of inclusivity, diversity, and community. Everyone has access to the public space, is equally encouraged for participation formats, and thus experiences appreciation. The design of our public space immensely facilitates care work and thereby also makes it visible. In this way, a resilient society is created, which independently faces challenges and solves problems.

Is diversity visible in public space?

representation of all genders, ages, and origins
consideration and appreciation of different cultures and traditions
reduce linguistic barriers
 
Does the public space demonstrate a reflective culture of remembrance?

balanced representation of diversity and variety
appreciation according to current social standards
support of the site-specific character

 

Are residents included in the design of the urban space?

encouraging and valuing participation
active involvement of neglected groups
promotion of cooperation and exchange of thoughts and ideas
open communication about future projects

Together for the City for All

Former car streets became new residential spaces in the superblocks of Barcelona (Gunnar Knechten/ spiegel.de)

Superblocks in Barcelona

The Superblocks in Barcelona aim to break the car-oriented urban planning. The concept involves combining nine blocks into a neighborhood, banning cars entirely, and giving the urban spaces back to its residents (Superblocks 2019). That created more space for trees and wide paths for pedestrians and cyclists. Moreover, the design improved the air quality and noise pollution in the neighborhood tremendously. The urban design promotes accessibility and organization of residents’ daily lives, with short distances between stores for everyday needs, work, and home. Barcelona’s 2024 Mobility Plan calls for constructing 503 superblocks throughout the city (Rostaria 2021).

In the Seestadt Aspern, public space is designed to be family-friendly (Daniel Hawelka/ aspern-seestadt)

Seestadt Aspern in Wien

A showcase example of the gender-sensitive planning approach is the City of Vienna’s Seestadt Aspern. The district is one of the major urban development projects in Europe. In the future, more than 25,000 residents will live here (City of Vienna, n.d.). Its planning focuses on the daily suitability and the orientation towards the scale of the human being. The gender-sensitive approach is evident – not just in the early participation of citizens but also by recognizing the needs of women* and children. There are wide sidewalks, proximity mobility centers, and a mix of uses at the neighborhood and building level. The public space represents the “female face” (Hunt and Kilian 2019) of Seestadt. All streets and squares are named after women.

Pop-up bike lanes on Rue de Rivoli in Paris (Dmitry Kostyukov/ NY Times)

Pop-Up Bike Lanes in Paris

The construction of pop-up bike lanes during the Corona pandemic in Paris generated a lot of attention beyond the city limits. They improved the spatial and functional connectivity of bike lanes and increased the sense of safety for all cyclists. Especially for women*, senior citizens, and children, introducing an area separated from the road for cycling was essential. According to studies, the lack of safety while cycling is their main barrier. The installation of additional bike lanes in Paris resulted in the percentage of women* bicycling increasing from 36% to 41% (Macmichael 2021). Due to the great success, Paris now wants to install the temporary bike lanes permanently. Proactively accelerating the transportation transformation makes the city a good reference for gender-sensitive planning and demonstrates the potential it holds for all residents.

The playscapes are adapted to the topography of the park's landscape (Ghiggi Paesaggi/ ghiggipaesaggi.com)

Pfingstweidpark in Zurich

The Pfingstweidpark in Zurich takes the different needs of its users into account. The park resulted in a competition process supported by Lares-Fachfrauen, an association for gender- and everyday-appropriate planning and building (Stadt Zürich, n.d.). Accordingly, the gender-sensitive planning approach is evident in the design and the park’s amenities. The park includes a variety of seating and activity options, numerous weather-protected areas, sanitary facilities, and a drinking fountain. Even at the planning stage, special attention was paid to creating synergy effects and avoiding potential use conflicts. For example, the benches are very close to shady trees and allow a view of the children’s playground

(Lares-Fachfrauen, n.d.).

Thank you!

Warmest thanks to everyone who supported HerCity Weimar from the first idea until March 8, 2022, and beyond. 

A big thank you goes to our HerCity team, who analyzed Weimar’s urban spaces with us in all weathers and got involved in numerous evenings full of discussions. Special thanks to Angelina for her support in animating our short film. Without you, our characters would have remained lifeless.

Thanks to the Professorship of Urban Design I, especially Steffen and Pola, for their constructive criticism and exciting impulses. Thanks to Edith for the purposeful guiding through the bureaucratic labyrinth and the great knitting patterns for socks! 

Thanks also to Professor Frank Eckardt, Alexandra Abel, and Birgitte Svarre, who always had an open ear for our concerns and helped us to broaden our view beyond architecture.

Many thanks to all our friends and families who helped us at any time and without hesitation. Thanks to Domi, Joscha, and Anna for your objective opinions and proofreading. Thanks to Sophia, Caro, Jonas, Nils, Marie, Nele, Alejandra, Cile, Denise

Last but not least, we would like to motivate all supporters who have not received their promised coffee yet to text us! We are looking forward to drinking coffee together!

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Imprint

Editors in charge

Lia Zinngrebe
Lisa Maßel

 

Graphics

© HerCity Weimar based on illustration by pch.vector, Freepik

 

Contact

info@hercityweimar.eu

 

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Superblocks. 2019. “Superblocks.” Superblocks. https://www.superblocks.org.

Szmigiera, M. 2021. “• Urbanization of the global population, by regional development 1950-2050.” Statista. https://www.statista.com/statistics/671366/change-in-urbanization-of-countries-worldwide-by-regional-development/.

Terlinden, Ulla, ed. 2003. City and Gender: Intercultural Discourse on Gender, Urbanism and Architecture. N.p.: Leske + Budrich.

UN Habitat. 2021. “HerCity.” #HerCity – Let her guide you. https://hercity.unhabitat.org.

Viebig, Annika. 2019. “Hilde Radusch.” Digitales Deutsches Frauenarchiv. https://www.digitales-deutsches-frauenarchiv.de/akteurinnen/hilde-radusch.

von Heyl, Marie, and Janna Aljets. 2020. “Feministische Stadtplanung.” https://eclecticengineering.podigee.io/8-feministische-stadtplanung.

Vu, Vanessa, Sina Niemeyer, and Meike Spitzner. 2019. “Städteplanung: Die männliche Stadt | ZEIT ONLINE.” Die Zeit. https://www.zeit.de/mobilitaet/2019-09/staedteplanung-maenner-geschlechtergerechtigkeit-berlin-bruessel-barcelona.

Wagener, Jessica. 2016. “Die gefährliche Einsamkeit der Großstädter.” Die Zeit, 10 20, 2016. https://www.zeit.de/zett/2016-10/die-gefaehrliche-einsamkeit-der-grossstaedter?utm_referrer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com%2F.

“Wangenheim, Inge von.” n.d. Thüringer Literaturrat e.V. Accessed February 18, 2022. http://www.thueringer-literaturrat.de/autorenlexikon/wangenheim-inge-von/.

“Weimar – Marie-Juchacz-Saal.” 2010. Stadt Weimar. https://stadt.weimar.de/stadtrat/marie-juchacz-saal/.

Wildner, Kathrin, and Hilke M. Berger. 2018. “Das Prinzip des öffentlichen Raums | bpb.” Bundeszentrale für politische Bildung. https://www.bpb.de/politik/innenpolitik/stadt-und-gesellschaft/216873/prinzip-des-oeffentlichen-raums.

WIR FRAUEN. 2003. “Stadtplanung.” WIR FRAUEN – Das feministische Blatt 4/2003. https://wirfrauen.de/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/Stadtplanung_WIR-FRAUEN-Das-feministische-Blatt-04-2003_webs.pdf.

WIR FRAUEN. 2012. “Wem gehört die Stadt?” WIR FRAUEN – Das feministische Blatt 2/2012. https://wirfrauen.de/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/Wem-gehoert-die-Stadt_WIR-FRAUEN-Das-feministische-Blatt-02-2012_webs.pdf.

WIR FRAUEN. 2021. “Feministische Stadtplanung.” WIR FRAUEN – Das feministische Blatt 3/2021. https://wirfrauen.de/ausgabe/feministische-stadt/.

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Gehl, Jan. 2015. Städte für Menschen. N.p.: Jovis.

Gore, Tim, Thorfinn Stainforth, and Antoine Lucic. 2021. “Sustainable and inclusive transport systems.” The Institute for European Environmental Policy. https://ieep.eu/publications/sustainable-and-inclusive-transport-systems-gender-and-mobility.

Groll, Tina. 2021. “Stadtplanung: “Wir müssen das Dorf zurück in die Stadt bringen.”” Die Zeit, February 13, 2021. https://www.zeit.de/mobilitaet/2021-02/stadtplanung-wien-eva-kail-gender-planning-frauen.

Günther, Regine. 2017. “METROPOLEN VERÄNDERN SICH – Nachhaltige Mobilität für alle.” Tagesspiegel Causa, December 11, 2017. https://causa.tagesspiegel.de/politik/zu-viele-autos-in-der-stadt/nachhaltige-mobilitaet-fuer-alle.html.

Harrouk, Christele. 2021. “HerCity: Digital Toolbox for Sustainable, Equal and Inclusive Cities.” ArchDaily. https://www.archdaily.com/958277/hercity-digital-toolbox-for-sustainable-equal-and-inclusive-cities.

HerCity Weimar. 2021. Datenerhebungen im öffentlichen Raum, PSPL Messungen, Messung von Grünphasen der Ampelschaltung, dB-Messungen.

HerCity Weimar, ed. 2021. Bewohner:innenbefragung zur Nutzung der öffentlichen Räume in Weimar. 

Holzbaur, Ulrich. 2020. Nachhaltige Entwicklung: Der Weg in eine lebenswerte Zukunft. N.p.: Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden.

Horn, Charlotte, Michael Latz, and Sharon Welzel. 2021. “Gender Planning – eine gerechte Stadt für alle | NDR.de – Nachrichten.” NDR. https://www.ndr.de/nachrichten/info/Gender-Planning-eine-gerechte-Stadt-fuer-alle,genderplanning106.html.

Horn, Katrin, Stefanie Freyer, and Nicole Grochowina, eds. 2009. FrauenGestalten Weimar-Jena um 1800: ein bio-bibliographisches Lexikon. Heidelberg: Universitätsverlag Winter.

Hunt, Elle, and Antonia Kilian. 2019. “Architektur Bauen für Frauen — der Freitag.” der Freitag, July 31, 2019. https://www.freitag.de/autoren/the-guardian/bauen-fuer-frauen.

Jahn, Thilo, and Eva Kail. 2019. “Leben in der Stadt: Planerin Eva Kail zu einer Stadtplanung, die Frauen in der City gerecht wird · Dlf Nova.” Dlf Nova. https://www.deutschlandfunknova.de/beitrag/leben-in-der-stadt-planerin-eva-kail-zu-einer-stadtplanung-die-frauen-in-der-city-gerecht-wird.

Kern, Leslie. 2020. Feminist City: Wie Frauen die Stadt erleben. Translated by Emilia Gagalski. N.p.: Unrast Verlag.

Klassik Stiftung Weimar. 2021. “In Kunst und Liebe vereint.” Klassik Stiftung Weimar. https://blog.klassik-stiftung.de/in-kunst-und-liebe-vereint/.

Krautsack, Daniela. 2021. “Die kommerzielle Nutzung des öffentlichen Raums.” Stadtmarketing Austria. https://www.stadtmarketing.eu/die-kommerzielle-nutzung-des-oeffentlichen-raums/.

Lares-Fachfrauen. n.d. “Factsheet Pfingstweidpark.” Factsheet Pfingstweidpark. Accessed February 5, 2022. https://assets.website-files.com/5e0a624dedb7540708ab3b71/5e0e1596152007767e7c746a_on-tour-2015-2-Factsheet.pdf.

Lauterbach, Gunter. n.d. “Petersen, Leiva Constanze.” Neue Deutsche Biographie 20 (2001), S. 257-258 [Online-Version]. Accessed February 18, 2022. https://www.deutsche-biographie.de/pnd118593145.html#ndbcontent.

Macmichael, Simon. 2021. “Six in ten users of pop-up bike lanes in Paris are new to cycling, says city’s government.” Road.cc, February 4, 2021. https://road.cc/content/news/6-10-users-pop-bike-lanes-paris-new-cycling-280681.

“Marga_Faulstich.” n.d. Chemie.de. Accessed February 18, 2022. https://www.chemie.de/lexikon/Marga_Faulstich.html.

Marie-Seebach-Stiftung Weimar. n.d. “Geschichte der Stiftung – Weimar.” Marie-Seebach-Stiftung. Accessed February 18, 2022. https://www.marie-seebach-stiftung.de/stiftung/geschichte-der-stiftung/.

Mendheim, Max. 1898. “Winter, Amalie.” Deutsche Biographie. https://www.deutsche-biographie.de/sfz85801.html.

Mossin, Natalie. 2018. An Architecture Guide to the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Edited by Sophie Stilling, Thomas C. Bøjstrup, Vibeke G. Larsen, Maja Lotz, and Annette Belgrad. Kopenhagen: Dystan & Rosenberg Aps.

Müller, Ulrike. 2007. Die klugen Frauen von Weimar: Regentinnen, Salondamen, Schriftstellerinnen und Künstlerinnen von Anna Amalia bis Marianne Brandt. München: Elisabeth Sandmann Verlag GmbH.

Müller, Ulrike, and Ingrid Radewaldt. 2019. Bauhausfrauen: Meisterinnen in Kunst, Handwerk und Design. München: Elisabeth Sandmann Verlag.

Nickel, Stefanie. 2021. “Kurze Wege und Gemeinschaft: Die feministische Stadt | Städte.” Frankfurter Rundschau, April 27, 2021. https://www.fr.de/zukunft/storys/staedte/kurze-wege-und-gemeinschaft-die-feministische-stadt-90478108.html.

Plan International Deutschland e.V. 2020. “Safe in the City? Zur gefühlten Sicherheit von Mädchen und Frauen in deutschen Städten.” https://www.plan.de/presse/safe-in-the-city.html.

Reckewerth, Johanna. 2021. Who cares? Sorgearbeit in Weimar. Weimar: n.p. Bachelorarbeit.

Rice Kinder Institute. 2021. “Urban Reads: Leslie Kern.” YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d6LlaGTaqKs.

Rostaria, Ronika. 2021. “Superblock (Superilla) Barcelona—a city redefined. Public Realm.” Cities Forum. https://www.citiesforum.org/news/superblock-superilla-barcelona-a-city-redefined/.

Schreiber, Claudia. 2021. “Der weibliche Blick auf die Stadt – oder: einfach nur eine.” Claudia Schreiber, Architektur und, Stadtplanung GmbH. https://claudia-schreiber-architektur.de/nachrichten/der-weibliche-blick-auf-die-stadt.

Schwarz, Carolina, and Caroline Criado-Perez. 2020. “„Die Datenlücke tötet Frauen“.” https://taz.de/Gender-und-Wissenschaft/!5685021&s=die+Datenlücke+tötet+frauen/.

“Sicherheit im öffentlichen Raum – Alltags- und Frauengerechtes Planen und Bauen.” n.d. Stadt Wien. Accessed January 31, 2022. https://www.wien.gv.at/stadtentwicklung/alltagundfrauen/sicherheit.html.

SPD Geschichtswerkstatt, Otto Rühle, and Wilhelm Bock. n.d. “Luise Zietz – SPD Geschichtswerkstatt.” SPD Geschichtswerkstatt. Accessed February 18, 2022. https://www.spd-geschichtswerkstatt.de/wiki/Luise_Zietz.

Stadtentwicklungsamt. 2021. “Statistisches Jahrbuch 2020.” Edited by Abteilung Geoinformation und Statistik and Kommunale Statistikstelle. Stadt Weimar. https://stadt.weimar.de/ueber-weimar/statistik/jahrbuecher/.

Stadtentwicklungsamt Weimar Abt. Stadtplanung and AG Radverkehr Weimar. 2017. “Radverkehrskonzept Weimar 2030,” Abschlussbericht Dezember 2017. Edited by Erhard Dunkel.

Stadtrat Weimar. 2022. “Ratsinfo Stadtrat.” Stadt Weimar. https://ratsinfo.weimar.de/buergerinfo/kp0040.php?__kgrnr=1&.

Stadt Weimar. 2021. Liste zur Neu-/ Umbenennung von Straßennamen in Weimar. auf Anfrage.

Stadt Weimar. 2022. “Weimar – Gleichstellungsbeauftragte.” Stadt Weimar. https://stadt.weimar.de/buergerservice/dienstleistung/gleichstellungsbeauftragte-87/.

Stadt Wien. n.d. “Gender Mainstreaming – aspern Seestadt.” Stadt Wien. Accessed February 5, 2022. https://www.wien.gv.at/stadtentwicklung/projekte/aspern-seestadt/planungsprozess/gender-mainstreaming.html.

StadtWirtschaft Weimar. 2021. “Fahrpläne.” Stadtwerke Weimar. https://sw-weimar.de/verkehr/#c4804.

Stadt Zürich. n.d. “Aus der Sicht der Nutzerinnen und Nutzer Planen.” Stadt Zürich. Accessed February 5, 2022. https://www.stadt-zuerich.ch/ted/de/index/taz/verkehr/mobilitaetsberatung/impuls_mobilitaet/im_interview_tuggener.html.

Superblocks. 2019. “Superblocks.” Superblocks. https://www.superblocks.org.

Szmigiera, M. 2021. “• Urbanization of the global population, by regional development 1950-2050.” Statista. https://www.statista.com/statistics/671366/change-in-urbanization-of-countries-worldwide-by-regional-development/.

Terlinden, Ulla, ed. 2003. City and Gender: Intercultural Discourse on Gender, Urbanism and Architecture. N.p.: Leske + Budrich.

UN Habitat. 2021. “HerCity.” #HerCity – Let her guide you. https://hercity.unhabitat.org.

Viebig, Annika. 2019. “Hilde Radusch.” Digitales Deutsches Frauenarchiv. https://www.digitales-deutsches-frauenarchiv.de/akteurinnen/hilde-radusch.

von Heyl, Marie, and Janna Aljets. 2020. “Feministische Stadtplanung.” https://eclecticengineering.podigee.io/8-feministische-stadtplanung.

Vu, Vanessa, Sina Niemeyer, and Meike Spitzner. 2019. “Städteplanung: Die männliche Stadt | ZEIT ONLINE.” Die Zeit. https://www.zeit.de/mobilitaet/2019-09/staedteplanung-maenner-geschlechtergerechtigkeit-berlin-bruessel-barcelona.

Wagener, Jessica. 2016. “Die gefährliche Einsamkeit der Großstädter.” Die Zeit, 10 20, 2016. https://www.zeit.de/zett/2016-10/die-gefaehrliche-einsamkeit-der-grossstaedter?utm_referrer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com%2F.

“Wangenheim, Inge von.” n.d. Thüringer Literaturrat e.V. Accessed February 18, 2022. http://www.thueringer-literaturrat.de/autorenlexikon/wangenheim-inge-von/.

“Weimar – Marie-Juchacz-Saal.” 2010. Stadt Weimar. https://stadt.weimar.de/stadtrat/marie-juchacz-saal/.

Wildner, Kathrin, and Hilke M. Berger. 2018. “Das Prinzip des öffentlichen Raums | bpb.” Bundeszentrale für politische Bildung. https://www.bpb.de/politik/innenpolitik/stadt-und-gesellschaft/216873/prinzip-des-oeffentlichen-raums.

WIR FRAUEN. 2003. “Stadtplanung.” WIR FRAUEN – Das feministische Blatt 4/2003. https://wirfrauen.de/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/Stadtplanung_WIR-FRAUEN-Das-feministische-Blatt-04-2003_webs.pdf.

WIR FRAUEN. 2012. “Wem gehört die Stadt?” WIR FRAUEN – Das feministische Blatt 2/2012. https://wirfrauen.de/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/Wem-gehoert-die-Stadt_WIR-FRAUEN-Das-feministische-Blatt-02-2012_webs.pdf.

WIR FRAUEN. 2021. “Feministische Stadtplanung.” WIR FRAUEN – Das feministische Blatt 3/2021. https://wirfrauen.de/ausgabe/feministische-stadt/.

Instagram-Channel

September 9th 2021

Since the base of our entire project was participation and exchange, the thought quickly occurred to us: How can we communicate with the residents of Weimar? For this reason, we started our Instagram channel early on. That allowed us to educate about feminist perspectives and problems of urban planning but also to document our entire project process.

With our studies, we intend to contribute to sustainable development. The United Nations has formulated the “17 Sustainable Development Goals” for this purpose, which should be implemented by 2030. They are an urgent call to action because not a single goal is achieved yet. Particularly complicated: All the resolutions are closely interlinked! Sustainable development can only get achieved if all goals are taken into account and advanced. With HerCity Weimar, we took a closer look at 5 of the 17 goals.

📄Mossin, Natalie. 2018. An Architecture Guide to the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Edited by Sophie Stilling, Thomas C. Bøjstrup, Vibeke G. Larsen, Maja Lotz, and Annette Belgrad. Kopenhagen: Dystan & Rosenberg Aps.
🔗 Darstellung nach: Bundesregierung/ Bundesregierung.de

 

#HerCity #unhabitat #stadtentwicklung #bauhausuniweimar #partizipation #urbangirlsmovement #stadtweimar #sustainability #SDG #goal11

Johanna Schopenhauer (1766 – 1838) was a famous writer and salonnière at the time of Weimar Classicism. With her debut novel “Gabriele”, which was about an intelligent and musically gifted young woman*, she became the third financially independent female professional author in Germany.

After her husband’s suicide, she moved with her daughter Adele to Weimar, to a flat at Windischengasse 13, where she soon established a bourgeois tea table that soon became obligatory for Weimar celebrities. Guests such as Goethe, Wieland or the painter Caroline Bardua discussed their latest works with her. Johanna Schopenhauer became the most important representative of the salon culture of Weimar Classicism. To this end, she also broke with her son, the philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer, who criticised her for her generous and independent lifestyle. Weimar’s Schopenhauerstrasse is dedicated to her.

 

📄Müller, Ulrike (2007): Die klugen Frauen von Weimar. Regentinnen, Salondamen, Schriftstellerinnen und Künstlerinnen von Anna Amalia bis Marianne Brandt. Elisabeth Sandmann Verlag, München.
🔗 Bild: Fresko – Magazin für Kultur- und Kunstgenießer (2020): Auf Augenhöhe. Künstler:innen der Romantik, in: https://www.fresko-magazin.de/auf-augenhoehe/ [13.01.2022].

Jane Jacobs was a Canadian journalist, urban and architectural critic living in the USA. In particular, she criticised American suburbs for the lack of liveliness on the streets, as well as the dependency on the automobile. These are problems that can particularly affect women, families and the elderly, but also lead to the reduction of public life in general. With her famous phrase – eyes on the street – she describes the importance of neighbourhoods that are lively 24/7 and neighbourhoods with mixed uses. Vibrant activity and the intensive use of public spaces increase the safety and confidence of residents through positive social control.

 

Jane Jacobs was much commented in her time because of her lack of professional education and was called a housewife. Today, her demands are considered almost standard in modern urban planning: the design of mixed and lively neighbourhoods, short distances and the prioritisation of people instead of cars.

 

📄https://www.eukn.eu/urban-voices/lily-maxwell-on-how-to-create-more-feminist-cities/
📄 https://comun-magazin.org/eyes-on-the-street-raum-und-sozialitaet/
📄Jane Jacobs (1963): Tod und Leben großer amerikanischer Städte
📄Leslie Kern (2019): Feminist City

How quickly time goes by. We were just discussing public spaces in Weimar during our city walk and last Thursday we were already saying goodbye to our team for the Christmas break! But before that, we held our design workshop and talked together about possible installations and implementations in Weimar’s urban spaces. What do you think: How did we answer the questions for us? We can assure you that there was a lot of discussion about the numerous options!

 

#HerCity #unhabitat #stadtentwicklung #bauhausuniweimar #partizipation #urbangirlsmovement #stadtweimar 

It can be quite dark in Weimar – we took a closer look last Friday! Together with a handful of HerCity participants, we went for a night walk through the city centre. We quickly agreed that some corners in Weimar are not only very poorly lit, but also deserted. Other places have a pleasant atmosphere and seem very romantic. What do you think? Do you like to be alone in Weimar at night?

 

#HerCity #unhabitat #stadtentwicklung #bauhausuniweimar #partizipation #urbangirlsmovement #stadtweimar 

We are already counting the days until our first meeting! On Tuesday, Oct. 12, 2021, we’ll meet at 4 p.m. at Herderplatz in Weimar to get to know each other. Lia and I will tell you about public spaces and why it’s so important to make them livable and inviting! Afterwards, we will walk through the city and evaluate Weimar’s public spaces together – you will surely see them with completely different eyes! Our registration period for the city walk runs until 10.10.2021 – be part of it!

 

#HerCity #unhabitat #stadtentwicklung #bauhausuniweimar #partizipation #urbangirlsmovement #stadtweimar 

We are counting down the days, because in four weeks it will already be March 8 – International Women’s Day! For over a hundred years, the social, political, economic and cultural achievements of women* and non-binary people have been celebrated on this day. For this year, HerCity Weimar has also planned a special action. What exactly, we will tell you in the coming days and weeks, so: stay tuned!

 

📄International Women’s Day 2022, unter: https://www.international

womensday.com. (05.02.2022).

#HerCity #unhabitat #stadtentwicklung #bauhausuniweimar #partizipation #urbangirlsmovement #stadtweimar #sustainability

Until today, people socialized to women are less appreciated in public space. You surely remember our posts about monuments and street names in Weimar! This is to be changed more and more often through creative actions: from feminist city walks to the covering of monuments of male persons, cities try to honor the memory of female socialised representatives of history. In 2019, to mark the 140th birthday of politician Marie Juchacz, some streets and squares in Weimar were also temporarily renamed.

 

In the coming posts, we will introduce you to other famous personalities from Weimar, whose work and significance in Weimar has received too little attention so far. Stay tuned!

 

📄 Radio Lotte (15.03.2019). Grüne benennen Straßen nach bedeutenden Frauen, in: https://www.radiolotte.de/weimar/gruene-benennen-strassen-nach-bedeutenden-frauen-30908.html (05.01.2022).
📄 Unsere Stadt – Frauen Planen Stadt. Dokumentation der Fachkonferenz am 22.März 1997 (auf Anfrage).

Most of our design work is significantly shaped by our own personal circumstances – for this reason it is important to promote diverse teams of planners. Even though there is almost equal distribution of study places in the field of architecture and urban planning, the national average of female urban planners is only 36.6%. However, the proportion of women is growing steadily.

A look at Weimar shows that the proportion of female planners in the field of architecture, urban planning and landscape planning is 40% and therefore slightly above the national average. According to the list of members of the Thuringian Chamber of Architects, 124 of 313 planners in Weimar are female.

 

📄 BAK. (14. Juli, 2021). Geschlechterverteilung der Architekten und Stadtplaner in Deutschland in den Jahren von 2012 bis 2021 [Graph], in: https://de.statista.com/statistik/daten/studie/37278/umfrage/geschlechterverteilung-bei-architekten/ (16.12.2021)
📄 Mitgliederliste der Architektenkammer Thüringen (auf Anfrage)

Women* in particular still perform unpaid care work in addition to paid work. To do this, they often make multi-stop journeys on foot, by bike or public transport. The mobility infrastructure of our cities, however, is based on the outdated role model that envisages the man as the breadwinner of a family who is supposed to commute from home to work in a short time. Men therefore got easier access to public space, roads were developed and cars were built for them. Those who do not drive get around less easily, take longer for many journeys and are exposed to motorised traffic without protection.

 

📄 Tim Gore et al (2021): Sustainable and Inclusive Transport Systems. The Institute for Environmental Policy, in: https://ieep.eu/publications/sustainable-and-inclusive-transport-systems-gender-and-mobility (02.12.2021).
📄 Vanessa Vu (2019): Die männliche Stadt, in: https://www.zeit.de/mobilitaet/2019-09/staedteplanung-maenner-geschlechtergerechtigkeit-berlin-bruessel-barcelona (02.12.2021).

We’re looking for people who know their way around Weimar and who want to tell us what they think about the city’s public spaces! You can find the link to the survey in our bio. Feel free to send the link to anyone who is interested in taking part – we look forward to your answers!

 

#HerCity #unhabitat #stadtentwicklung #bauhausuniweimar #partizipation #urbangirlsmovement #stadtweimar 

What makes a place your favourite? I’m sure each of you has a favourite place – a place where you feel right at home. Safe and secure. Where you like to relax, enjoy the sun and just look around. A place where you like to be alone, but are just as happy to share it with friends. We have put together a list of some of our favourite places in Weimar. Now it’s your turn. What are your favourite places in Weimar?

 

#HerCity #unhabitat #stadtentwicklung #bauhausuniweimar #partizipation #urbangirlsmovement #stadtweimar 

Lucia Moholy (1894-1989) was a female photographer, publicist and documentarian who worked at the Bauhaus in Weimar and Dessau from 1923-1928. Together with her husband, the Bauhaus master László Moholy-Nagy, she worked in the field of experimental photography. However, to this day she remains in his shadow and anonymously documented his ideas. She photographed numerous Bauhaus products for the sample catalogues – without being officially employed at the Bauhaus. In the process, her name became blurred behind the name of the artist couple. However, it is her photographs in particular that significantly determine our idea of the Bauhaus today. Lucia Moholy subsequently and repeatedly spoke out for the lack of recognition of all Bauhaus women. In her biographical fragment, she criticises the cult of the master as well as the lower evaluation of the work of female students and the master women at the Bauhaus.

She is the namesake of Lucia Verlag, a publishing house founded in 2014 as a student initiative that publishes creative and inventive student work. Lucia Moholy has not yet been honoured in public space in Weimar.

 

📄 Müller, Ulrike (2009): Bauhaus-Frauen : Meisterinnen in Kunst, Handwerk und Design. Elisabeth Sandmann Verlag,
München.
📄 Emma (2022): Die Frauen am Bauhaus. https://www.emma.de/artikel/bauhaus-die-bauhaus-frauen-264076. [15.01.2022].
🔗 Bild: Bauhauskooperation (2022): Lucia Moholy. 1923-1928 Fotografin am Bauhaus, in: https://www.bauhauskooperation.de/wissen/das-bauhaus/koepfe/personen-aus-dem-umfeld-des-bauhauses/lucia-moholy/ [13.01.2022].

More than 20 years ago, the working group “Our City – Women Plan the City” was founded in Weimar. At a symposium in cooperation with the Bauhaus University on March 22, 1997, women* from various backgrounds discussed urban planning problems in Weimar that were in need of improvement. The demands collected there should then be introduced into the daily work of urban development. Unfortunately, the working group dissolved after a short time for reasons that are unknown to us.

 

Nevertheless, many of the demands from back then are still relevant today – they overlap with the findings from our residents’ survey, our interviews, and the participatory workshops. But see for yourself!

 

📄 Unsere Stadt – Frauen Planen Stadt. Dokumentation der Fachkonferenz am 22.März 1997 (auf Anfrage)
🔗 Vektorgrafiken auf Grundlage von: [Надежда Пехова]/stock.adobe.com sowie freepik.com

The man as the measure of all things – unfortunately, this is also true in science. The book “Invisible Women” by @ccriadoperez is about the so-called Gender Data Gap. How is data collected in science and what impact does this have on the reality of FLINTAs’ lives? Caroline Criado-Perez shows why collecting gender-sensitive data is essential for all of us. In our post, we have collected just a few of the numerous examples – you can find the entire book in the library of the Bauhaus University Weimar.

 

📄 Caroline Criado-perez (2020): Unsichtbare Frauen : wie eine von Daten beherrschte Welt die Hälfte der Bevölkerung ignoriert (1. Aufl.). btb Verlag.
📄 Carolina Schwarz (2020): Die Datenlücke tötet Frauen, in: https://taz.de/Gender-und-Wissenschaft/!5685021/ (02.12.2021).